Translate Toolkit & Pootle

Tools to help you make your software local

User Tools


Press

This page contains the press releases and a few other files we've accumulated (some of them private, hence password protected).

Press release submitted

We submitted the first press release on 30 January 2008 to the following sites: Express-Press-Release, PressReleaseForum, Free-Press-Release, OpenPR, PR.com, i-Newswire, PressReleaseSpider, PressExposure, PR9, PressMethod, PR-Inside, FreePressIndex, PrUrgent, NewsWireToday. We got lots of spam in return, and one lead (which turned out to be just a very interesting advertisement).

Press release 1

More languages given a boost with volunteer software translation project

Language communities in countries where computers still 'speak' only English or other global language will benefit in 2008 from a software translation project launched by the African localisation company Translate.org.za. The company recently received generous funding from the international grantmaking foundation, the Open Society Institute to help volunteers in those countries help make computer programs available in their own languages.

During the project, which is named the Decathlon project, volunteer translators from all over the world will be assisted to translate ten computer applications into their own languages. The Decathlon project is a continuation of Translate.org.za's efforts to promote the creation of translation communities by volunteer native speakers in all countries.

According to Samuel Murray, the Decathlon project leader, many world languages face an uphill struggle in countries where computer programs are in English despite the fact that few people speak English fluently. People who are passionate about their own languages do not always have the technical expertise to help make more software available in their languages, he says.

The Decathlon project was designed to bridge the gap between volunteer translators and developers of opensource software. The project makes use of a web-based translation tool, Pootle, which was created by Translate.org.za specifically to help volunteers do translation without requiring any programming expertise.

“One of the problems with software translation, is that different development teams require different procedures to translate their programs,” says Murray. “These procedures can be quite complicated, and this acts as a barrier for people to join translation teams as volunteers.”

The Decathlon project will liaise with the development teams of selected computer programs to make their translatable content more accessible to volunteer translators. Translators can then translate directly in their web browsers, or if they prefer, they can use professional translation software of their choice.

The software considered for translation, include an educational drawing program, a blogging system, a music editing program, a multimedia player, and a word processor. According to Murray, the final selection of programs to be translated has not been made, and the Decathlon team is eager to be contacted by developers of other opensource projects wishing to participate in this localisation project.

“We are also eager to hear from translators who wish to form new teams or join existing teams in their own countries,” says Murray. “After all, the whole point of the Decathlon project is to help create sustainable translation communities who can help themselves and others to promote software in their own languages.”

More information about the Decathlon project can be found on the web site http://translate.sourceforge.net/wiki/decathlon/mainpage, or contact the project leader, Samuel Murray, at samuel@translate.org.za.

Press release 2

African localisation firm selected to help translate software into world languages

A project to assist with software translation into several langauges, including minority languages, has just been launched by the South African localisation and software development company Translate.org.za. The project, which is called the Decathlon project, is funded by the international grantmaking foundation, the Open Society Institute.

The Translate.org.za company is well-known in South Africa for its efforts to promote opensource software in all of South Africa's eleven official languages. The company has designed a set of tools and a web-based translation system to facilitate volunteer translators in their efforts to localise computer programs into languages from all over the world. The Decathlon project is their latest drive to empower willing volunteers for the benefit of software users in their countries.

During the year 2008, the Decathlon project will assist volunteer translators and translation teams in the localisation of ten strategic opensource programs. Staff from Translate.org.za will take care of the technical aspects of each program, leaving translators free to focus on that which they do best, namely the translation process itself.

According to Samuel Murray, the Decathlon project leader, the aim of the project is to help volunteer translators help themselves, by removing obstacles traditionally found in localisation projects and by providing tools that make translation simpler and more consistent.

“Computer users from non-English speaking countries are often eager to help translate programs into their own languages, but their enthusiasm wanes when they realise how complicated the non-translation aspects of software translation are,” says Murray. “The Decathlon project is designed to remove these obstacles and solve related problems to help prevent volunteers from becoming discouraged.”

The Decathlon project will liaise with the development teams of selected computer programs to make their translatable content available on Translate.org.za's web-based translation system, Pootle. Translators can translate directly in their web browsers, or if they prefer, they can use professional translation software too. Pootle contains semi-automated controls to help maintain consistency in the translation, and checks to ensure that the translations do not 'break' the software they're intended for.

The software considered for translation, include an educational drawing program, a blogging system, a music editing program, a multimedia player, and a word processor. According to Murray, the final selection of programs to be translated has not been made, and the Decathlon team is eager to be contacted by developers of other opensource projects wishing to participate in this localisation project.

“We are also eager to hear from translators who wish to form new teams or join existing teams in their own countries,” says Murray. “After all, the whole point of the Decathlon project is to help create sustainable translation communities who can help themselves and others to promote software in their own languages.”

More information about the Decathlon project can be found on the web site http://translate.sourceforge.net/wiki/decathlon/mainpage, or contact the project leader, Samuel Murray, at samuel@translate.org.za.

Programs we're trying to do

(todo)

Programs we don't do yet

Here is a list of programs that we've investigated but for some or other reason decided not to translate (yet). These reasons include things like (a) too many words, (b) incompatible file formats, © insufficient development or project dormant, and (d) subject overlap with currently translated project.

We don't want to offend anyone, so this file is private.

List of programs we've decided not to translate right now (private file, password protected).

Template letters

The template letters and other snippets are all private. They're not interesting anyway.

Ideas

Let's not forget any cool ideas.